2014 Autonomous Mobility Appliqué System – Capabilities Advancement Demonstration (AMAS CAD)

The 2014 AMAS CAD was held at Boaz Military Operations and Urban Terrain Site in Fort Hood, Texas. The demonstration was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Central Command, Army Capabilities Integration Center, Combined Arms Support Command, 3rd Cavalry Regiment and the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC).

AMAS CAD featured driverless vehicles autonomously negotiating live traffic, following the rules of the road, recognizing pedestrians and avoiding obstacles in both urban and rural road conditions.

This autonomy enabled system of the future provides our Warfighters a technological advantage on the battlefield and the flexibility to adapt to tomorrows ever-changing and evolving threats by creating greater stand-off distance from danger, making supply distribution more efficient, and decreasing the logistical burden now and for the next 30 years.

To stay connected with TARDEC on the web visit tardec.army.mil or visit our Facebook site at www.facebook.com/tardec

 

Laser Weapon System (LaWS)

120804-N-ZZ999-001 SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Jul. 30, 2012) The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105) in San Diego, Calif., is a technology demonstrator built by the Naval Sea Systems Command from commercial fiber solid state lasers, utilizing combination methods developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. LaWS can be directed onto targets from the radar track obtained from a MK 15 Phalanx Close-In Weapon system or other targeting source. The Office of Naval Research’s Solid State Laser (SSL) portfolio includes LaWS development and upgrades providing a quick reaction capability for the fleet with an affordable SSL weapon prototype. This capability provides Navy ships a method for Sailors to easily defeat small boat threats and aerial targets without using bullets. (U.S. Navy video by Office of Naval Research/ Released)

The International Monitoring System

The CTBTO network:

The Infrasound Network:

The CTBTO uses infrasound stations to monitor the Earth mainly for atmospheric explosions.

The Radionuclide Network:

The CTBTO uses radionuclide monitoring to detect radioactive particles and noble gases (ie xenon) in the atmosphere.

The Hydroacoustic Network:

The Seismic Network:

CTBTO Tracks Fukushima’s Radioactive Release:

 

 

 

 

 

 

DARPA Legged Squad Support System (LS3) Demonstrates New Capabilities

This video depicts field testing of the DARPA Legged Squad Support System (LS3). The goal of the LS3 program is to demonstrate that a legged robot can unburden dismounted squad members by carrying their gear, autonomously following them through rugged terrain, and interpreting verbal and visual commands.

To learn more about LS3, please visit http://go.usa.gov/rwQB.

Soft robot camouflage system

Having already broken new ground in robotics with the development, last year, of a class of “soft”, silicone-based robots based on creatures like squid and octopi, Harvard scientists are now working to create systems that would allow the robots to camouflage themselves, or stand out in their environment.

As described in a paper published August 16 in Science, a team of researchers led by George M. Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, has developed a “dynamic coloration” system for soft robots that might one day have applications ranging from helping doctors plan complex surgeries to acting as a visual marker to help search crews following a disaster.

In this video, Stephen Morin, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Chemistry and Chemical Biology and first author of the paper, discusses the research and demonstrates how the system works.

Robotic two ball juggling

“Two Ball Juggling with High-speed Hand-Arm and High-speed Vision System,” by Takahiro Kizaki and Akio Namiki from the Graduate School of Engineering at Chiba University in Japan.

Revolutionary space engine system for Skylon tested

British engineers have begun a crucial series of tests of an experimental engine technology that its designers believe could revolutionise space travel.

The Skylon project is a concept for a spaceplane which could fly from runway to orbit in a single stage.

The key is a unique design for an engine that operates as a jet and rocket motor combined.
The critical component is a specially-designed cooling system to handle the high temperatures of rapidly-flowing air.