Flyover of Mars

From the highest volcano to the deepest canyon, from impact craters to ancient river beds and lava flows, this showcase of images from ESA’s Mars Express takes you on an unforgettable journey across the Red Planet.

Mars Express was launched on 2 June 2003 and arrived at Mars six-and-a-half months later. It has since orbited the planet nearly 12 500 times, providing scientists with unprecedented images and data collected by its suite of scientific instruments.

The data have been used to create an almost global digital topographic model of the surface, providing a unique visualisation and enabling researchers to acquire new and surprising information about the evolution of the Red Planet.

The images in this movie were taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera and the video was released by the DLR German Aerospace Center as part of the ten years of Mars Express celebrations in June 2013. The music has been created by Stephan Elgner of DLR’s Mars Express planetary cartography team. DLR developed and is operating the stereo camera.

Read the original post on DLR’s website here: http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefau…

Credit: ESA / DLR / FU Berlin (G. Neukum)

Neosignal – Planet Online

Watch the video 😉

(via I Fucking Love Music, like the page)

Curiosity: NASA Lands Car-Size Rover Beside Martian Mountain

NASA’s most advanced Mars rover Curiosity has landed on the Red Planet. The one-ton rover, hanging by ropes from a rocket backpack, touched down onto Mars Sunday to end a 36-week flight and begin a two-year investigation.

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft that carried Curiosity succeeded in every step of the most complex landing ever attempted on Mars, including the final severing of the bridle cords and flyaway maneuver of the rocket backpack.

Gas nozzle dripping problem solved

When fuel consumers are finished pumping gas, a number of fuel drops fall to the ground. Globally, these drops amount to roughly half a billion litres of fuel which is unnecessarily evaporated into our atmosphere each year. We at DRAM Innovations have developed a method to retaining and recycling this wasted fuel.

Learn more on www.DRAMInnovations.com

Planet Earth’s Northern Hemisphere

A timelapse of Planet Earth from Electro-L, a geostationary satellite orbiting 40000km above the Earth. The satellite creates a 121 megapixel image every 30 minutes with four visible and infrared light wavelengths. The infrared light appears green in these images, and shows vegetation.  The images are the largest whole disk images of our planet, the resolution is 1 kilometer per pixel.   The images are “masked” by a circular barrier that blocks out the light of the Sun and other stars.  This is to prevent damage to the camera by exposure to direct sunlight.  City lights are not visible because they are thousands of times less bright than the reflection of sunlight off the Earth.  The images have been interpolated (blended) to create a smooth animation.