Device Charging Market Umbrella

umbrella usb

umbrella usb 2

umbrella usb 3

Four 10″ x 4 1/4″ solar panels woven into the umbrella’s 9′ diameter canopy convert sunlight into electricity which is accessed via two USB ports in its pole. A rechargeable 3.7-volt/1000mA backup battery provides power in overcast conditions, ensuring smartphones and tablets have an uninterrupted supply of power. The umbrella’s canopy withstands wind gusts and blocks 98% of the sun’s harmful UV rays for a UPF rating of 50+, the highest attainable. The lightweight yet sturdy 8′ L aluminum pole and spreaders have a powder-coated finish for weather resistance. The umbrella opens and closes easily via a smooth-operating hand crank.

More info at http://www.hammacher.com/Product/83416?PID=3640241

‘Wet’ computer server could cut internet waste

New liquid-cooled Iceotope computer servers installed at the University of Leeds cuts energy used for cooling Internet servers by more than 80 percent. The whirring fans of traditional computers are replaced by the barely-audible trickle of liquid. The heat released can be piped out to radiators to warm a building. The developers say it could revolutionise the energy-hungry data centres that form the fabric of our online lives.

But don’t we all know that liquid and electronics don’t mix? Dr Jon Summers, from the University of Leeds’ School of Mechanical Engineering, shows what happens when you put an iPhone in a beaker of the secret ingredient: 3M (TM) Novec (TM) liquid.

WARNING: The phone experiment shown in this video is intended to demonstrate the special qualities of the liquid used in the Iceotope server. Putting an electronic device in liquid can cause problems other than a short circuit. Liquid is likely to be trapped and may affect the functionality of the device (eg. screen dimming or ghosting, speaker problems).

For more details on the Iceotope Servers at Leeds see: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3374/wet_computer_server_could_cut_internet_waste

 

Electromagnetic harvesting device

EMGSM-Harvester-3-640x640 Dennis Siegel

Bremen-based designer Dennis Siegel built special devices that are able to tap into several electromagnetic fields to exploit them, where the energy is stored in typical batteries. Users can then retain the charges from the power supply of any machine, a cell phone or the catenary of a train by holding the harvester directly into the electromagnetic field whose strength is indicated by a LED on the top of the object.

Depending on the strength of the electromagnetic field it is possible to charge a small battery within one day. The system is meant to be an option for granting access to already existing but unheeded energy sources. By exploring these sources it can create a new awareness of the invisible electromagnetic spaces.

Read more at his website: http://dennissiegel.de/electromagnetic-harvester/

W3C Web Alarms API

This specification defines a System Level API to provide  access to the device alarm settings, which can schedule a  notification or for an application to be started at a specific  time. For example, some applications like alarm-clock, calendar  or auto-update might need to utilize Alarm API to trigger  particular device behaviors at specified time points.

Find out more on http://www.w3.org/TR/2013/WD-web-alarms-20130205/

Honda UNI-CUB Personal Mobility Device

Honda Motor Co. unveiled the new UNI-CUB personal mobility device, designed for harmony with people. Featuring a compact design and comfortable saddle, UNI-CUB offers the same freedom of movement in all directions that a person enjoys while walking.
Representing the evolution of the U3-X personal mobility device that Honda announced in 2009, UNI-CUB features Honda’s proprietary balance control technology and the world’s first omni-directional driving wheel system (Honda Omni Traction Drive System). These technologies allow the rider to control speed, move in any direction, turn and stop, all simply by shifting his or her weight. Since the rider can freely move forward, backward, side-to-side and diagonally, he or she can quickly and easily maneuver among other people.
Moreover, UNI-CUB’s compact saddle-style packaging makes it easy for the rider’s legs to reach the ground and maintains eye-level height with other pedestrians. This configuration promotes harmony between the rider and others, letting the rider travel freely and comfortably inside facilities and among moving people.
Starting in June 2012, Honda will jointly conduct demonstration testing of UNI-CUB with Japan’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation.

Microsoft Illumishare

IllumiShare enables remote people to share any physical or digital object on any surface. It is a low-cost, peripheral device that looks like a desk lamp, and just like a lamp lights up a surface at which it is pointed, IllumiShare shares a surface. To do this, IllumiShare uses a camera-projector pair where the camera captures video of the local workspace and sends it to the remote space and the projector projects video of the remote workspace onto the local space. With IllumiShare, people can sketch together using real ink and paper, remote meeting attendees can interact with conference room whiteboards, and children can have remote play dates in which they play with real toys.