Nokia City Lens for Nokia Lumia: Augmented Reality Browser (Beta)

Nokia City Lens http://nokia.ly/Im17jr instantly connects you to all of the places you’re looking for—and even more importantly—gets you there exactly when and how you want to. Now available on Nokia Betalabs.

Just landed in town and looking for a good restaurant? Interested in checking out the local museum or theater? Time to hit the nearest transit station to catch a ride uptown?  No longer is finding your chosen destination a hassle—whether you’re in a new city or your hometown.
Now you can simply launch Nokia City Lens on your phone to easily find all the places you want to go. City Lens instantly reveals what you’re looking for on your phone’s camera display, no matter if it’s down the street or just around the corner.

You simply tap your chosen destination on your screen to conveniently access walking directions, make a reservation, or learn more detailed information about the locale.

Augmented Reality Sandbox with Real-Time Water Flow Simulation

Augmented Reality Sandbox:

Video of a sandbox equipped with a Kinect 3D camera and a projector to project a real-time colored topographic map with contour lines onto the sand surface. The sandbox lets virtual water flow over the surface using a GPU-based simulation of the Saint-Venant set of shallow water equations.

Virtual Dam Failure and Fun with Water :

Another AR sandbox video, showing how to build and fill up a large reservoir to simulate a dam failure, and just general messing around with virtual water.

Find out more at:
http://idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/SARndbox/

Beamatron

Beamatron is a new, augmented-reality concept that combines a projector and a Kinect camera on a pan-tilt moving head. The moving head is used to place the projected image almost anywhere in a room. Meanwhile, the depth camera enables the correct warping of the displayed image for the shape of the projection surface and for the projected graphics to react in physically appropriate ways. For example, a projected virtual car can be driven on the floor of the room but will bump into obstacles or run over ramps. As another application, we consider the ability to bring notifications and other graphics to the attention of the user by automatically placing the graphics within the user’s view.

Hoppala! Augmentation and Layar

HOPPALA! Augmentation provides an easy way for non-technical creatives to start experimenting with augmented reality and Layar. Create your own augmented reality experiences with just some mouse clicks and publish your work at Layar, the world‘s largest augmented reality platform.

This is the augmented reality version of the Berlin Wall in 3D featured on Hoppala!:

Hoppala! is a Layar partner. Don’t forget to check out Layar, they have their app for Android and iPhone. A Symbian version is in development, no news about a Windows Phone 7 version yet.

What is Layar?
The Layar Reality Browser shows what is around you by displaying real time digital information on top of the real world as seen through the camera of your mobile phone. This technology is called Augmented Reality. We augment the real world as seen through your mobile phone, based on your location.

How does Layar’s Augmented Reality work?
The idea is simple: Layar works by using a combination of the mobile phone’s camera, compass and GPS data to identify the user’s location and field of view, retrieve data based on those geographical coordinates, and overlay that data over the camera view.

Have fun ;)

[ hoppala ] [ layar ]

LuminAR

And again we are back with a cup of Augmented Reality (AR).

This time it’s something very cool: a light bulb :D

LuminAR reinvents the traditional incandescent bulb and desk lamp, evolving them into a new category of robotic, digital information devices. The LuminAR Bulb combines a Pico-projector, camera, and wireless computer in a compact form factor. This self-contained system enables users with just-in-time projected information and a gestural user interface, and it can be screwed into standard light fixtures everywhere.

The LuminAR Lamp is an articulated robotic arm, designed to interface with the LuminAR Bulb. Both LuminAR form factors dynamically augment their environments with media and information, while seamlessly connecting with laptops, mobile phones, and other electronic devices. LuminAR transforms surfaces and objects into interactive spaces that blend digital media and information with the physical space. The project radically rethinks the design of traditional lighting objects, and explores how we can endow them with novel augmented-reality interfaces. LuminAR was created by Natan Linder and Pattie Maes from the Fluid Interfaces Group at the MIT Media Lab. Video produced by Paula Aguilera and Jonathan Wiliams.