Gatewing X100

Nice, but I guess a helicopter like the Microdrone UAV or the Falcon looks more stable…

Update:

You can download specifications from the Gatewing X100 thanks to M. Vandenbroucke from Gatewing.

Don’t forget to read the comments, he explains also why the Gatewing X100 is better to buy. 😉

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4 thoughts on “Gatewing X100

  1. Hello Teusje

    Thanks for blogging on our product! You and your readers can download more product information here: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2140388/GWX100_productleaflet.pdf

    I need to say though, that stability is the core characteristic of the aircraft. We operate in perfect straight lines, and fully autonomous with winds op to 7 Bft! This allows us to scan and map terrains in a wide range of weather conditions. It is simply another device than the MicroDrone for another purpose …

    Don’t hesitate to ask for more information!

    Regards. – maarten

  2. Hi Maarten,

    First of all, thanks for answering this post. The post has been updated.
    (Sometimes I’m just sharing hi-tech things on my blog with the world. Glad I could share some Belgian quality work! )

    I can agree that this gatewing can operate on a bigger range of weather conditions and that it is also very stable (I was just having some twisted thoughts on the stability when I saw that movie on deredactie.be, that’s why I added the comparison between the MicroDrone and falcon.)

    When having a look at the falcon ( https://teusje.wordpress.com/2010/07/17/ascending-technologies-asctec-falcon/ ) or Helicam ( https://teusje.wordpress.com/2010/05/02/taking-aerial-pictures-and-videos-using-helicam/ ) or others, I guess they can be modified and equipped with the same cameras and hardware as the Gatewing X100.
    Why would I take the risk to damage the hardware (camera, wings etc..) when landing with a ‘higher’ speed compared to a helicopter landing? (Just wondering 😉 )

    A second question that might also be interesting for other readers: Are there any possibilities to project the recorded data on (free) mapping software like Bing Maps or do you have to have/buy your own GIS software (Esri, …)?

    A bit off-topic: might be interesting for you:
    https://teusje.wordpress.com/2010/07/03/arcgis-explorer-online-silverlight-bing-maps/
    https://teusje.wordpress.com/2010/07/26/shoothill-berlin-zeitkarte-timemap/
    https://teusje.wordpress.com/2010/07/25/keep-it-cool/

  3. Hi again

    I’ll summarize in answer the essence of your question.

    A helicopter system, e.g. the Microdrone – a magnificent product! , is perfectly suited for covering a small area. In application it can be equipped with a video or photo camera.

    Our system is fixed fitted with a digital photo camera and is meant to scan large area’s. Up to 4 km2 (400ha) in one flight. This can only be achieved using a fixed wing UAV (vs a heli system). Please note that we are also staying under the 2kg threshold and paying a lot of importance to user-friendliness.

    A precondition for being able to fly such long flights in a stable way, is a proper aerodynamic design, and high speed. We operate between 60km/h and 130km/h. Only during take-off and landing we experience some turbulence, which is normal. During flight, the system is designed to fly in very straight lines. Images are taken on a position based algorithm.

    This step is called image acquisition. The value is now created by going through the next step of image processing. Our raw image set (sometimes up to 2000 images) is now processed into a high quality orthophoto. These 5cm resolution images can be imported into Bing maps or Google Earth easily! The quality is really amazing.

    A next step is to turn them into topographic digital terrain models. For this, specialized software is used.

    You see, Gatewing and Microdrones are really two different and even compatible products. It just depends on what you want to do!

    Stay tuned: we are putting our product movie online soon!

    twitter.com/gatewing

    Cheers. – maarten

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