Robotic two ball juggling

“Two Ball Juggling with High-speed Hand-Arm and High-speed Vision System,” by Takahiro Kizaki and Akio Namiki from the Graduate School of Engineering at Chiba University in Japan.

DARPA’s Robotic Suspension System

The use of ground robots in military explosive-ordinance-disposal missions already saves many lives and prevents thousands of other casualties.  If the current limitations on mobility and manipulation capabilities of robots can be overcome, robots could potentially assist warfighters across a greater range of missions.  DARPA’s Maximum Mobility and Manipulation (M3) program seeks to create and demonstrate significant scientific and engineering advances in robot mobility and manipulation capabilities.
This video shows a modified iRobot 510 PackBot equipped with an advanced suspension system maneuvering on a test course.  The compliant suspension improves the robot’s mobility over rough and uneven terrain.  The technological enhancement enables faster transit speeds, climbing of very steep slopes, improved heading control, greater accommodation of debris entering the suspension and reduced impact forces on carried payloads.
M3 is a research program aimed at improving robot capabilities through fundamentally new approaches to the engineering of better design tools, fabrication methods and control algorithms. The program covers scientific advancement across four parallel tracks: design tools, fabrication methodologies, control methods and technology-demonstration prototypes.  The prototypes demonstrated are designed to test technological advances in robotics across a range of functions, and are not necessarily intended to enter production for military use.
The DARPA M3 performer for the Advanced Suspension for Improved Mobility system is iRobot of Bedford, Mass.
For more information on the M3 program, please visit http://go.usa.gov/E0B

LuminAR

And again we are back with a cup of Augmented Reality (AR).

This time it’s something very cool: a light bulb :D

LuminAR reinvents the traditional incandescent bulb and desk lamp, evolving them into a new category of robotic, digital information devices. The LuminAR Bulb combines a Pico-projector, camera, and wireless computer in a compact form factor. This self-contained system enables users with just-in-time projected information and a gestural user interface, and it can be screwed into standard light fixtures everywhere.

The LuminAR Lamp is an articulated robotic arm, designed to interface with the LuminAR Bulb. Both LuminAR form factors dynamically augment their environments with media and information, while seamlessly connecting with laptops, mobile phones, and other electronic devices. LuminAR transforms surfaces and objects into interactive spaces that blend digital media and information with the physical space. The project radically rethinks the design of traditional lighting objects, and explores how we can endow them with novel augmented-reality interfaces. LuminAR was created by Natan Linder and Pattie Maes from the Fluid Interfaces Group at the MIT Media Lab. Video produced by Paula Aguilera and Jonathan Wiliams.