RV FLIP (FLoating Instrument Platform)

RV FLIP (FLoating Instrument Platform) is an open ocean research vessel owned by the Office of Naval Research and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.The ship is a 355 feet (108 meters) long vessel designed to partially flood and pitch backward 90 degrees, resulting in only the front 55 feet (17 meters) of the vessel pointing up out of the water, with bulkheads becoming decks. When flipped, most of the buoyancy for the platform is provided by water at depths below the influence of surface waves, hence FLIP is a stable platform mostly immune to wave action, like a spar buoy. At the end of a mission, compressed air is pumped into the ballast tanks in the flooded section and the vessel returns to its horizontal position so it can be towed to a new location.The ship is frequently mistaken for a capsized ocean transport ship

FLIP is designed to study wave height, acoustic signals, water temperature and density, and for the collection of meteorological data. Because of the potential interference with the acoustic instruments, FLIP has no engines or other means of propulsion. It must be towed to open water, where it drifts freely or is anchored. In tow, FLIP can reach speeds of 7–10 knots.
FLIP weighs 700 long tons (711 tonnes) and carries a crew of five, plus up to eleven scientists. It is capable of operating independently during month-long missions without resupply,being able to operate worldwide but the normal area is the west coast of the United States. The vessel operates out of a home base at the Scripps Nimitz Marine Facility in San Diego, California.

Laser Weapon System (LaWS)

120804-N-ZZ999-001 SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Jul. 30, 2012) The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105) in San Diego, Calif., is a technology demonstrator built by the Naval Sea Systems Command from commercial fiber solid state lasers, utilizing combination methods developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. LaWS can be directed onto targets from the radar track obtained from a MK 15 Phalanx Close-In Weapon system or other targeting source. The Office of Naval Research’s Solid State Laser (SSL) portfolio includes LaWS development and upgrades providing a quick reaction capability for the fleet with an affordable SSL weapon prototype. This capability provides Navy ships a method for Sailors to easily defeat small boat threats and aerial targets without using bullets. (U.S. Navy video by Office of Naval Research/ Released)

Windenergy convertor EWICON

How does a “windmill” without mechanically moving parts work? TU Delft researchers Johan Smit and Dhiradj Djairam developed the EWICON (Electrostatic Windenergy CONvertor), a windenergy convertor that transforms windenergy into electricity without mechanical moving parts. This animation shows how it works and can be deployed.

ViralSearch: Identifying and Visualizing Viral Content

What does it mean for online content to “go viral”? An analysis of almost a billion information cascades on Twitter news, videos, and photos has produced the first quantitative notion of whether something has indeed gone viral, thereby enabling further research into topic experts, trending topics, and viral-incident metrics.

More info at http://research.microsoft.com/apps/video/default.aspx?id=185452

SketchInsight: automatically completing sketches

SketchInsight is an interactive whiteboard system for storytelling with data by using real-time sketching. Creating personalized, expressive data charts becomes quick and easy. The presenter simply sketches an example, and SketchInsight automatically completes the chart by synthesizing from example sketches.

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/cue/sketchinsight/index.html

BLINK for Windows Phone 8

blink

With BLINK for Windows Phone 8, you’ll never miss the best shot. BLINK captures a burst of images beginning even before you press the shutter and continuing beyond. No problem if you push the shutter a few moments too early or too late. With BLINK, a simple finger swipe lets you find the perfect shot. You can even return to BLINK to find a second and third shot from a single capture. Advanced image stabilization technology from Microsoft Research removes camera shake and lets you focus on the important parts of the scene.

This tutorial video for BLINK showcases the different usage scenarios of the app.

Get the app for free:
http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/sto…

More information: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/blink/

BLINK forums: http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/BLINK